We are not the Other; We are Universal: Disability, Culture and Society

Kyle Lewis Jordan is a 2020 Snowdon Scholar and member of the Disabled Leaders Network. He is currently completing his thesis – focusing on the role and significance of disabled people in early court societies in Egypt – for his studies of the Archaeology and Heritage of Egypt and the Middle East at University CollegeContinue reading “We are not the Other; We are Universal: Disability, Culture and Society”

Disability and Transitions: Reflections on Moving from Academia to Full-Time Employment

Molly is a 2021 Snowdon Scholar and member of the Disabled Leaders Network. She is currently completing an Mphil in Classics at Cambridge University and has recently secured a job with Office for Students, due to start in the Autumn. In this blog Molly shares her reflections as a disabled student moving into employment andContinue reading “Disability and Transitions: Reflections on Moving from Academia to Full-Time Employment”

Q & A with Jonny Huntington

Jonny Huntington is a disabled athlete, explorer and a member of the Disabled Leaders Network having completed a masters in Sport and Health Science at Exeter University in 2019/20. In this conversation, we spoke with Jonny about his next ambition – to be the first disabled person to solo the South Pole, ever. Jonny aims toContinue reading “Q & A with Jonny Huntington”

Inclusive Workspaces

This blog has been written by Uzoamaka Anita Asiegbu – a member of the Disabled Leaders Network: INCLUSIVE WORKSPACES With over one billion persons with disabilities globally, I think disability inclusion in the workplace is essential to an organisation’s growth. An inclusive workplace offers employees with disabilities — whether visible or invisible — an equalContinue reading “Inclusive Workspaces”

What if there were more disabled leaders?

My name is Msafiri Ngololo and I am from Tanzania. The desire to have a disabled leadership career led me to pursue a Disability, Design and Innovation masters course; in order to create change, influence inclusion in social policy, identify and remove the disabling barriers in my home country and Africa at large. Disability isContinue reading “What if there were more disabled leaders?”

It’s Time Society Stopped Playing the Independence Card to the Detriment of Disabled People

Until the age of eight, I was educated in a special needs school. Contrary to stereotype, the environment (as I recall) provided ample stimulation and nurturance. This, I believe, was thanks in part to the considerable degree of setting and streaming that occurred in the school’s delivery of learning. The establishment itself, to the bestContinue reading “It’s Time Society Stopped Playing the Independence Card to the Detriment of Disabled People”

When it comes to a disability, visibility of difference is a two-sided coin

I think it’s fair to say that we live in an ocular-centric society, people are obsessed with sight, and we equate that with knowledge, just think of terms like “I see” to mean “I understand”.  Equating sight with knowledge is dangerous, especially for those who feel an entitlement to “know”. “Why is your arm likeContinue reading “When it comes to a disability, visibility of difference is a two-sided coin”

Investing in inspirational disabled leaders; a journey into Snowdon scholarships

In January, Snowdon Trust and the GDI Hub opened applications for the second national Snowdon Masters Scholarships programme, in our search for exceptional disabled graduates with the potential to become tomorrow’s leaders.  Funding up £30,000 per student, these scholarships seek to identify and accelerate talented disabled people that have shown excellence in their chosen field of study orContinue reading “Investing in inspirational disabled leaders; a journey into Snowdon scholarships”

How access to education changed the trajectory of my entire life

About me My name is Paul Ntulila; 27 years ago I left Tanzania, East Africa, with my parents and my older sister, to move to the UK for a better life. My parents had their suspicions about my deafness but I wasn’t formally diagnosed until the age of 3, after we moved to London. IContinue reading “How access to education changed the trajectory of my entire life”